TWD 2019 About TWD 2019 Speaker Information

TWD 2019 Speakers/Presenters
(listed in alphabetical order by last name; Updated: 04/18/19)

Alison Gammie PhDAlison Gammie, Ph.D., is Director of the NIGMS Division of Training, Workforce Development, and Diversity, which supports the Institute's research training, career development and diversity-building activities through a number of programs at the undergraduate, graduate, postdoctoral and faculty levels.

Prior to joining NIGMS, Gammie served as a senior lecturer in molecular biology at Princeton University, where she also directed the university's Program for Diversity and Graduate Recruitment in Molecular and Quantitative Biology and its Summer Undergraduate Research Program in Molecular and Quantitative Biology. She was also an associate clinical member at the Cancer Institute of New Jersey. Her research focused on understanding how defects in DNA mismatch repair lead to cancer.

Gammie earned a B.A. in biology from Reed College and a Ph.D. in molecular biology from Oregon Health Sciences University. She conducted postdoctoral research at Princeton University.

Jon Lorsch, PhDJon Lorsch, Ph.D. became the director of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) in August 2013.  In this position, Lorsch oversees the Institute's $2.5 billion budget, which supports basic research that increases understanding of biological processes and lays the foundation for advances in disease diagnosis, treatment and prevention.  Lorsch came to NIGMS from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, where he was a professor in the Department of Biophysics and Biophysical Chemistry. He joined the Johns Hopkins faculty in 1999 and became a full professor in 2009. A leader in RNA biology, Lorsch studies the initiation of translation, a major step in controlling how genes are expressed. When this process goes awry, viral infection, neurodegenerative diseases and cancer can result. To dissect the mechanics of translation initiation, Lorsch and collaborators developed a yeast-based system and a wide variety of biochemical and biophysical methods. The work also has led to efforts to control translation initiation through chemical reagents, such as drugs. Lorsch continues this research as a tenured investigator in the NIH's Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

Lorsch received a B.A. in chemistry from Swarthmore College in 1990 and a Ph.D. in biochemistry from Harvard University in 1995, where he worked in the laboratory of Jack Szostak, Ph.D. He conducted postdoctoral research at Stanford University in the laboratory of Daniel Herschlag, Ph.D.Lorsch is the author of more than 70 peer-reviewed research articles, book chapters and other papers. He has also been the editor of six volumes of Methods in Enzymology and has been a reviewer for numerous scientific journals. He is the author on two awarded U.S. patents. His honors include six teaching awards from Johns Hopkins.

Lorsch's other activities have included membership on the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology's mentoring committee, the RNA Society's board of directors and NIH review committees. Since joining NIH, he has taken on several leadership roles, including serving on the NIH Scientific Data Council, Administrative Data Council and Extramural Activities Working Group, which he co-chairs.

Michael Sesma PhDMichael Sesma, Ph.D., is chief of the Postdoctoral Training Branch in the NIGMS Division of Training, Workforce Development, and Diversity, where he oversees postdoctoral programs for research training, postdoctoral fellowship, career development programs, as well as the Innovative Programs to Enhance Research Training (IPERT) and workforce modeling programs. Sesma returned to NIGMS after a 10-year career at the National Institute of Mental Health, where he was chief of the Research Scientist Development Program in the Office for Special Populations. Before that, he was a scientific review administrator in the NIGMS Office of Scientific Review and a program director in the Institute's Division of Genetics and Developmental Biology. Sesma earned a B.A. in biology and psychology from the University of California, San Diego, and a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of California, Riverside. He conducted postdoctoral research at Vanderbilt University.

Shiva Singh PhDShiva Singh, Ph.D., is chief of the Undergraduate and Predoctoral Training Branch in the NIGMS Division of Training, Workforce Development, and Diversity (TWD). This branch supports predoctoral T32 training programs, predoctoral F30 and F31 fellowships, and a broad array of undergraduate and graduate student development programs. Singh currently administers a portfolio of institutional research training grants at the interface of the behavioral and biomedical sciences. Previously, he managed several other programs in TWD as well as research grants in the areas of host-microbe symbiotic relationships, microbial community ecology and adaptive responses to stress in the Division of Genetics and Developmental Biology. He also oversaw systems biology, scientific workforce modeling and complex biological systems modeling grants in the Division of Biomedical Technology, Bioinformatics, and Computational Biology. Prior to joining NIGMS, Singh was chair of the department of biological sciences and director of biomedical research and training programs at Alabama State University. He earned a B.Sc. and M.Sc. in plant sciences from Pant University of Agriculture and Technology and a Ph.D. in microbiology from Auburn University. He conducted postdoctoral research at Auburn University and Argonne National Laboratory.

 
 
2019 TWD Program Directors' Meeting is managed and organized by:
    
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
 

Funding for this conference was made possible (in part) by T36GM008637-21 and U13GM133156-01 (pending) from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences. The views expressed in written conference materials or publications and by speakers and moderators do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the NIH; nor does mention by trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.